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Amy Roberts | Education

Undergraduate School

Swarthmore College

1994, Swarthmore, PA

Medical School

Dartmouth Medical School

1998, Hanover, NH

Internship

University of Massachusetts Medical Center

1999, Worcester, MA

Residency

University of Massachusetts Medical Center

2001, Worcester, MA

Residency

Harvard Medical School Genetics Training Program

2004, Boston, MA

Amy Roberts | Professional History

Dr. Amy Roberts is originally from Acton, MA and has been in Boston since 2001 when she joined the Harvard Medical School Genetics Training Program. Her philosophy of care is to treat each child as an individual and to understand their needs not only in the context of a genetic diagnosis but also how that influences their school, social, and family life. Dr. Roberts fell in love with the discipline of genetics when she was a pediatrics resident.

Dr. Roberts is trained in both clinical genetics and pediatrics. Her research focuses on genotype phenotype correlations in Noonan syndrome and other Rasopathies and Noonan syndrome gene discovery. She also is interested in genetic causes of congenital heart disease. Dr. Roberts is the Director of the Boston Children’s Hospital Cardiac Gene Project (BCH CGP), a registry and DNA repository for families affected by congenital heart disease. She is the director of clinical cardiovascular genetic research for the department. Her principal clinical activities involve a cardiovascular genetics clinic and inpatient consultation for children with a potential genetic cause of their congenital heart disease. Her interests include Noonan syndrome, CFC syndrome, Williams syndrome, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, 22q11 deletion syndrome and cardiomyopathy. 

 

Dr. Robers serves as an expert for the Department of Cardiology for Boston Children's Hospital Precision Medicine Service. For more information about the Precision Medicine Service please visit bostonchildrens.org/precisionmed.

Amy Roberts | Publications

This is the most exciting time in medicine to practice as a geneticist, as we have never before available tools to understand the genetic underpinnings of cardiovascular disease. With these new tests though comes increased responsibility to practice responsibly, ethically, and always with the best interest of the child and his or her family foremost in mind.